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ROYAL AIR FORCE. COMMON CORE AND DEPLOYMENT SKILLS AIDE-MEMOIRE

PART 2. DEPLOYMENT SKILLS

DEPLOYMENT SKILLS

DEPLOYMENT PREPARATION

PERSONAL ADMINISTRATION

The following checklist should be used as an aid to ensure you are fully prepared for a lengthy deployment. A theatre specific detailed list will be issued from PSF prior to deployment.

◉ RAF F1250.

◉ RAF F6471 next of kin details.

◉ ID Discs.

◉ Passport.

◉ Nato Travel Order.

◉ Attachment card.

◉ Pay book.

◉ F/ldent 189 British Forces ID card.

◉ JSP 381.

◉ UK/International driving licence.

◉ FMT 600.

◉ Common Core and Deployment Skills Aide-Memoire.

◉ F7192 (green card).

◉ S10 Respirator check card.

◉ JSP 398.

◉ Vaccinations.

◉ Medically fit.

◉ Routine medication (ample supplies for initial stages of the deployment).

◉ Dentally fit.

◉ Kit insurance (private arrangements).

◉ Money.

◉ Cheque-book and guarantee card.

◉ Credit card.

FAMILY CARE PLAN

The following checklist, which is not exhaustive, should be used as an aid to ensure that you make adequate provision for your family or partner whilst deployed. Many of the topics will require time to organise and should be addressed as a matter of routine.

◉ Will.

◉ Life insurance.

◉ Emergency procedures and contact numbers for:

● Medical situations.

● Dental problems.

● Gas, water, electricity and telephones.

● Vehicles.

ROUTINE EXPENDITURE

Ensure that you have made adequate financial provisions to cover:

◉ Electricity, gas, water.

◉ Rent/mortgage.

◉ Council tax.

◉ Phone bills.

◉ Credit cards.

◉ TV licence.

◉ House, car, life insurance.

◉ Road tax.

◉ Credit and rental agreements.

CLOTHING AND EQUIPMENT CHECK LISTS

The type and scale of equipment and clothing you are issued with will differ dependent on the area, the readiness state and your unit's mission/SOPs. The following list is an aid that cannot cover all types of equipment available or every way to

pack it. If you are in any doubt about what to pack, and how, seek advice from your line manager or RAF Regt Fit.

PERSONAL LOAD CARRYING EQUIPMENT (PLCE)

The PLCE you are required to carry will vary according to the threat or task. Local orders will dictate what is to be carried and when. The following is a guideline, which will allow you to anticipate what you require to prepare, before detailed orders are given:

FIRST LINE -CS95

No apparent threat, your responsibility is to be prepared to Survive-to-Operate in support of operations.

◉ ID discs are to be worn around the neck.

◉ All equipment should be waterproofed.

◉ Personal weapons are to be carried when ordered.

◉ CBA is to be worn when ordered.

SECOND LINE - BELT ORDER

Personnel are required to carry out defensive tasks within a Survive-to-Operate environment, i.e., sentry duties. Second line is carried, when ordered, in addition to first line.

◉ Magazines and ammunition (if issued).

◉ Weapon cleaning kit.

◉ Bayonet (when issued).

◉ Water bottle and mug.

◉ Water purification tablets (if issued).

◉ Emergency rations (as required).

◉ Torch and batteries.

◉ Sun screen, insect repellent and foot powder (if issued).

The respirator haversack and combat helmet could be carried on your person or attached to your third line Bergen depending on the Alert State or local orders.

◉ Combat helmet.

◉ Respirator haversack containing:

● Respirator and canister.

● Spare canister (sealed and in date).

● 3 × Combo Pens (CP).

● NAPS (when issued).

● DKP1.

● DKP 2.

● One colour detector paper.

BELT ORDER-CONTENTS:

BAYONET FROG: Bayonet and scabbard.

AMMUNITION POUCHES: Magazines and ammunition.

WATER BOTTLE POUCH: Water bottle, mug and puritabs.

RESPIRATOR HAVERSACK: Respirator and canister, spare canister, 3 x CP, NAPS tablets, DKP 1 and 2 and one colour detector paper.

UTILITY POUCH: Weapon cleaning kit, torch and spare batteries, sun screen, insect repellent, foot powder and emergency rations.

READY USE BERGEN POUCHES

Bergen right-hand side pouch.

This pouch contains your NBC clothing. It can be carried on your person or attached to your third line Bergen, depending on the alert state or local orders:

◉ NBC suit.

◉ NBC overboots.

◉ NBC gloves inner and outer.

Bergen left-hand side pouch.

This pouch should contain ready to use items of equipment and clothing sufficient for a period of up to 24 hours. It can be carried on your person or attached to your third line Bergen, depending on the Alert State or local orders:

◉ Warm top layer (fleece or Norwegian shirt, if not worn).

◉ Spare socks and foot powder.

◉ Gortex jacket and trousers.

◉ Mess tin, cooker and rations (as required).

◉ Knife, fork and spoon (KFS).

◉ Spare water as required.

THIRD LINE - BERGEN

Personnel are required to operate in an austere environment where resources such as messing, transport and accommodation are limited. Third line clothing and equipment is carried in addition to first and second line. This equipment and clothing will allow you to operate in austere conditions with limited resources for up to 14 days. Third line should be waterproofed and packed with the intention of being carried by you, in the worst case this will become your marching order.

◉ Spare DPM jacket, shirt and trousers.

◉ Spare footwear, laces, insoles and rank slides.

◉ 3 × pairs of socks.

◉ Spare underwear and T-shirts.

◉ Cold weather clothing, fleece or Norwegian shirt.

◉ Thermal underwear (theatre dependent).

◉ Spare rations.

◉ Dirty laundry bag.

◉ Sleeping system.

◉ Biwi bag.

◉ Shelter sheet, pegs and elastics.

◉ Roll mat/camp bed.

◉ Washing and shaving ML

◉ Towel.

◉ Boot cleaning kit.

◉ Clothing repair sewing kit.

◉ 20m of green string.

◉ Supplementary first aid kit (suggested, not issued): Eg, aspirin, plasters, bandages, antiseptic wipes and cream, blister kit and tape.

◉ Ancillary kit: Spare batteries, pencils, pen, matches, spare hat and gloves.

FOURTH LINE - HOLDALL

Personnel are to pack enough clothing and equipment to support a long-term deployment Your fourth line holdall contains additional clothing and equipment to support you for long term deployment. Remember that in the initial stages of a deployment access to luxuries such as toiletries, washing powder and writing materials may be limited.

◉ Spare DPM clothing.

◉ Spare underwear and socks.

◉ Sports kit,

◉ Training shoes.

◉ Swimming costume.

◉ Spare toiletries and towels.

◉ Washing powder.

◉ Writing materials.

◉ Civilian clothing.

◉ Books.

◉ Small personal music system.

CLOTHING AND EQUIPMENT REMINDERS

PREPARATION

It is your responsibility to ensure that you have all the correct clothing and equipment prior to deployment. Check all items are fully serviceable, replenish all consumable items such as weapon cleaning kit, oil, flannelette and Scotchbright. Remember: "failing to prepare is preparing to fail".

SELF-DISCIPLINE AND HUSBANDRY

Keeping your clothing and equipment dry, clean and serviceable is your personal responsibility. Be self-disciplined, establish a routine for checking and repairing clothing and equipment on a regular basis. If an item is no longer in use, pack it away. Keep your operational equipment close at hand and ready to use. Always BE PREPARED to react to a situation.

HEALTH AND HYGIENE

Disease can have a devastating effect on you, your team and operations. You must make every effort to ensure you maintain the highest standards of personal hygiene. You must also practise and educate others to practise high standards of collective (team) hygiene.

CAUSES AND SPREAD OF DISEASE

Diseases are caused by germs or parasites and can be passed by person to person or animal to people.

HOW DISEASE TRAVELS

◉ Through the air. Tuberculosis, influenza, scarlet fever and mumps.

◉ Contact. Directly or indirectly with a contaminated source.

◉ Sexually transmitted disease. AIDS, gonorrhoea, syphilis, genital warts and body lice.

◉ Faeces and urine. Dysentery, cholera, typhoid and food poisoning.

◉ Insects. Malaria, plagues, yellow fever, typhus and scrub typhus.

ROUTES OF ENTRY INTO THE BODY

◉ Inhalation.

◉ Absorption. Through skin or eyes.

◉ Ingestion. Infected food and water.

◉ Injection. Insect bites.

HYGIENE - INDIVIDUAL MEASURES

◉ Hair. Keep short, clean and regularly combed to deter parasites and allow easy access to treat head injuries.

◉ Face. Wash and shave daily to ensure correct fitting of the respirator.

◉ Teeth. Brush after every meal if possible, twice daily as a minimum. This will help to prevent oral infection and tooth decay.

◉ Body. Wash daily, paying particular attention to the armpits and groin area. Always take the opportunity to shower when available. Wash any cuts, grazes and splinters and treat with antiseptic cream and protect with a waterproof plaster.

◉ Feet. Ensure boots fit correctly and are serviceable. Wash, dry and powder feet and change socks daily. Keep nails trimmed and have blisters treated at the earliest opportunity.

◉ Clothing and sleeping system. Wash your clothing, especially underwear, frequently. Air your sleeping system daily.

HUMAN WASTE DISPOSAL

◉ If a latrine is sited, it is to be used.

◉ If there is no latrine, a hole must be dug and the excreta covered with soil.

◉ Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water after visiting the latrine.

COOKING AND EATING

RATIONS

Generally, a Mobile Catering Unit will provide catering whilst deployed. During the initial stages of a deployment or in extreme circumstances you will be expected to cook your own rations. The most common type of rations available is the 24- hour ration pack. The cooking instructions are found in the sundries pack and it is a good guide to successful cooking. The following are additional considerations:

◉ Always seek permission before starting to cook, the Alert State, threat level or lighting plan may dictate that only cold food or drink is to be taken.

◉ Wash hands and cooking utensils prior to cooking.

◉ Practise good food hygiene throughout.

◉ Clear an area twice the size of the cooker to ground level, this will reduce the risk of fire.

◉ Wear a leather glove when handling hot items.

◉ Once finished all utensils must be washed and packed away immediately.

◉ Do not leave food lying around, as this will attract vermin.

◉ Dispose of all rubbish in an authorised area. If none is available keep hold of rubbish and dispose of it later.

WATER

◉ Only drink water from an authorised source.

◉ If you are in any doubt about the purity of the water, add purification tablets as instructed on the package.

◉ As a last resort boil the water for at least 10 minutes. Scum must be taken off the top, prior to cooling and then drinking.

EATING AT A MOBILE CATERING UNIT

◉ Wash hands thoroughly with soap and water before handling food.

◉ Remove as much dirt from boots and clothing as possible.

◉ If practical, remove camouflage cream.

◉ Thoroughly clean KFS/mess tins/mug/plates before and after use. If available use disposable items.

◉ Always dispose of waste food and rubbish in the correct areas provided.

◉ If the Alert Sate dictates ensure your weapon, respirator and helmet are close to hand.

◉ Have consideration for others.

ACCLIMATISATION

Your body will require time to adjust to new climatic conditions. Partial acclimatisation will start to occur within one week. It may take up to three weeks for your body to become fully acclimatised.

COLD CONDITIONS

◉ Dress correctly; remember the rule: 'loose and in layers'.

◉ Add and remove layers according to your work rate and body temperature.

◉ Maintain body temperature by increasing your intake of food and hot drinks.

◉ Keep socks and feet dry, wear insulated insoles.

◉ Avoid frostbite by protecting extremities, fingers, toes and nose.

◉ In extremes of cold, protect all exposed areas using vaseline and lipsalve.

◉ Learn to identify the signs and symptoms of hypothermia.

HOT CONDITIONS

◉ Dress correctly. Be aware that the desert can be extremely cold at night.

◉ Keep shirt collars fastened and shirt sleeves rolled down, to protect from sunburn and insects.

◉ Protect against sunburn with sun cream.

◉ Increase fluid intake to 8-10 pints of water per day. Alcohol causes dehydration.

◉ Learn the signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heatstroke.

FIELD ENGINEERING

SHELTER GENERAL PURPOSE (SGP)

The Service issue tent is manufactured from heavy-duty canvas, supported on a lightweight alloy framework of poles and brackets. Different variants of tent exist, however the principle of siting and erection remain the same. The design is such that the tents can be linked together as required, to provide a versatile and flexible shelter complex.

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