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ROYAL AIR FORCE. COMMON CORE AND DEPLOYMENT SKILLS AIDE-MEMOIRE

TENTED ACCOMMODATION

Discipline in the tented area is vital. You have a collective responsibility for the following:

◉ Site discipline for waste disposal.

◉ Site discipline for urination and defecation.

◉ Do not feed feral animals.

◉ Do not adopt local wildlife as mascots.

TENT CONTENTS (12ft × 12ft - 3.66m × 3.66m)

FIG 1

◉ 1 x Valise containing (fig 1):

◉ 1 x Roof and wall section.

◉ 2 x End sections.

◉ 1 x Liner (not shown).

● 1 × Groundsheet (not shown).

● 2 × Storm lashings.

● 2 × Webbing ties.

● 4 × Guide ropes.

◉ 1 × 'A' and T piece bag containing:

● 9 × 'a' pieces.

● 6 × 't' pieces.

◉ 1 × Pole bag containing:

● 22 × Poles.

◉ 1 × Peg bag containing:

● 24 × 10 pegs.

● 10 × 18 pegs.

● 1 × 3lb hammer.

SITING CONSIDERATIONS

◉ Pitching space - 21ft × 21 ft, 6.4m × 6.4m.

◉ Maximum height - 8ft 10in, 2.66m.

◉ The site should offer good drainage and protection from the elements.

◉ Site the entrance to the tent away from the prevailing wind.

◉ If possible the site should provide natural camouflage.

◉ Flat and even.

◉ Free from stones and roots.

ASSEMBLY

FIG 2

◉ Lay out the poles, 'a' and 't' pieces (fig 2).

FIG 3

◉ Assemble the poles to form the roof section (fig 3).

◉ Attach the liner (if required) to hang below the apex and eaves ridgepoles.

FIG 4

◉ Lift the canvas onto the roof frame and fit the 'a' piece ends into the sleeves on the end sections of

the outer canvas. Tie the sleeves firmly onto the 'a' piece (fig 4).

◉ Lay the storm lashings over the roof.

◉ Place all wall canvas onto the tent roof, this will aid when raising the tent.

FIG 5

◉ With one man on each 'a' piece of the windward side of the tent, raise the tent and fit the wall poles and 't' pieces (fig 5).

◉ Pull the windward side wall section down into position.

◉ Secure all the ground poles and 't' pieces through the securing loops on the wall canvas.

◉ Attach all internal roof and liner ties.

◉ Repeat with the leeward side.

◉ Check the doors fasten correctly.

◉ Secure all 't' pieces firmly to the ground using 10 pegs, this secures the frame to the ground.

FIG 6

◉ Peg down all guy ropes and storm lashings (fig 6).

◉ Peg down and secure the entrance that is not in use.

◉ Use sandbags to ballast the cloths and skirts.

◉ Stow all bags and spare equipment.

FIG 7

◉ Use your imagination to make your tent as homely as possible (fig 7).

BREAKING CAMP

To break camp, the assembly instructions are carried out in reverse order.

FUEL FILLED HEATERS AND LAMPS

There are many types of heating and lighting appliances. The type of appliance you are issued will depend on your unit's scale of equipment and the theatre you are deploying to. There are significant health and safety issues when using heaters and lights in a tented area. The following are some common safety considerations:

◉ Only fill the appliance with the correct type of fuel.

◉ Only store fuel in approved containers that have been marked.

◉ Always wear gloves and goggles when fuelling/emptying appliances.

◉ Always refuel at a POL point.

◉ Never fill the appliance whilst lit or hot.

◉ Never leave the appliance alight at night whilst asleep.

◉ Never leave the appliance unattended.

◉ Never stand appliances on or under tables.

◉ Always stand appliances on level ground.

◉ Always use metal hooks to suspend lamps.

FIELD DEFENCES

Where there is a threat of attack every member of the deployed force should have a stand-to or shelter position to go to. In the early days of a deployment you may have to prepare shellscrapes and trenches to provide protection against small arms fire, mortar, artillery and air attacks.

STAND-TO POSITIONS

Should Provide:

◉ Cover from fire.

◉ Cover from view. This includes view from Thermal Imagery, if possible.

◉ A solid background will avoid silhouetting sentries. The overhead cover can be angled to provide a solid background.

◉ Detailed Range Card.

◉ Arc Markers.

◉ Where possible protection from the elements.

◉ Roll mats can be used to provide insulation from the cold.

SURVIVAL SHELLSCRAPES

Considerable protection can be achieved quickly with a minimum of digging. By developing the hole further a good firing position can be constructed. They are only suitable as temporary positions.

BATTLE TRENCH

The Battle Trench offers good protection against small arms fire, mortar, artillery and air attacks. Overhead protection is designed to provide ballistic protection and reduce the effects of nuclear radiation. The Individual Kit Protection can be used to construct overhead protection; instructions for its use are enclosed in the kit.

WIRE OBSTACLES

The following list contains the stores, tools and their approximate weight and how many can be loaded onto a 4 tonne truck.

ITEMAPPROX WEIGHTHOW MUCH 1 MAN CAN CARRYNo PER 4 TONNE TRUCK
PICKETS5.4kg 1.8 METRES4750
PICKETS 0.6 METRES1.8kg61990
BARBED WIRE ROLL 120 METRES12.7kg1260
DANNERT WIRE ROLL 13.5 METRES22.7kg160
SLEDGE HAMMER6.5kg
PICKET THUMPER13kg
WIRE CUTTERS0.7kg
WIRING GLOVES0.5kg
WINDLASSING STICK0.5kg

WIRE TYPES

LOW WIRE

PROS: Quickly erected in woods or scrub. Pickets not always required. Easily concealed. Not easy to destroy or breach.

CONS: Has to be concealed to be effective.

REMARKS: Particularly suitable for close country. Use ordinary barbed wire at shin height, deployed irregularly.

SINGLE CONCERTINA

PROS: Quick and simple. Can be improved in stages. Easily concealed.

CONS: Easily breached. REMARKS: Not a standard obstacle but may be used as a starting point.

TRIPLE CONCERTINA

PROS: Can be developed from a single concertina.

CONS: Difficult to conceal. Fairly easily breached.

TYPE 4

PROS: Can be developed from a single concertina. More difficult to breach. Simple to construct. Relatively easy to conceal.

DOUBLE APRON

PROS: Ordinary barbed wire from fences, etc, can be used.

CONS: Slow to construct. Easily breached.

REMARKS: In general only used where concertina wire is not available.

CATWIRE TYPES 1, 2 and 3

PROS: Difficult to breach. Can be improved in stages. Looks a formidable obstacle.

CONS: Difficult to conceal. Types 2 and 3 expensive in stores. Not suited to protect a defensive position.

REMARKS: Used mostly for protection of static positions, ie, key points.

HIGH WIRE

PROS: Difficult to breach. Looks a formidable obstacle.

CONS: Difficult to conceal. Expensive in stores. Not suited to protect a defensive position.

REMARKS: Used mostly for protection of static positions, ie, key points.

STORES NEEDED FOR 100m OF OBSTACLE

DANNERT CONCERTINASBARBED WIRE REELS1.8m PICKET0.6m PICKET
LOW WIRE-16-220
SINGLE CONCERTINA7128-
TRIPLE CONCERTINA21456-
TYPE 428280-

SANDBAG EMPLACEMENTS

◉ A sangar 2m × 2m × 0.7m high will need 200 sandbags.

◉ 3 people can fill approximately 60 sandbags in 1 hour.

◉ Sandbags are 3/4 filled and their necks (chokes) tied.

◉ Sandbags are laid so that neither their chokes nor side seams are in the outer face of the wall.

◉ The corners of each bag are tucked in as they are laid.

◉ The chokes are tucked under to prevent bursting.

◉ Each sandbag when laid must be beaten with a pick helve or shovel.

◉ Joints in adjacent courses are staggered.

◉ The sangar should be approximately shoulder height with fire ports.

◉ Camouflage once completed.

The following illustrations are in plan view:

COURSES 1, 3, 5, etc

COURSES 2, 4, 6, etc

REPORT FORMATS

SITUATION REPORT (SITREP)

◉ The SITREP is probably the simplest report to send or receive. Used at all levels across the 3 Services and throughout NATO and recognised in its standard format.

◉ The SITREP is used to give a commander up-to-date information of the situation that has developed or is developing on the ground.

SITREP
To
From
Title
As At/DTG
CODESER NOSUBJECTINFORMATION
ALPHATime of report (DTG)
BRAVOOwn Forces
CHARLIEEnemy Forces
DELTAIntentions

CONTACT/SIGHTING REPORT

◉ In a contact report it is assumed that the enemy is aware of the friendly forces position, usually because exchange of fire has taken place.

◉ A sighting report is used when enemy forces are sighted, no exchange of fire has taken place, and it is assumed that the enemy is unaware of the observer.

◉ Whilst all serials should be transmitted, it is generally accepted that occasionally, due to the nature of the incident, not all serials will be reported.

CONTACT/SIGHTING REPORT
To
From
TitleCONTACT/SITREP (1)
As At/DTG
CODESER NOSUBJECTINFORMATION
ALPHATime of contact/sighting (DTG)
BRAVOLocation of contact/sighting
CHARLIELocation of observer (3)
DELTATarget description
ECHOAction by target
FOXTROTAction by own forces
UXB
To
From
TitleUXB
As At/DTG
CODESER NOSUBJECTINFORMATION
ALPHAExact location of the UXB
BRAVOEstimated size
CHARLIEEstimated quantity
DELTAEvidence of chemical agents
ECHOAdditional information
CASEVAC REQ
To
From
TitleCASEVAC REQ
As At/DTG
CODESER NOSUBJECTINFORMATION
ALPHANo of stretcher cases
BRAVONo of sitting cases
CHARLIENo of walking cases
DELTACas type
ECHOPUP
FOXTROTAdditional information

BIOLOGICAL/CHEMICAL NBC 1 REPORT

◉ A system for warning and reporting of NBC hazards is well established throughout NATO. It is vital that the information is made available as soon as possible so that commanders can react accordingly and warn other units, thus preventing unnecessary casualties.

◉ This information can be passed via a standard NBC 1 format recognised by the 3 Services and throughout NATO.

◉ Not all the information required may be available at once, however, it is important that serials A-F be transmitted at the earliest opportunity so that predictions can be formulated. A completed NBC 1 should be transmitted as soon as the information becomes available.

◉ The NBC 1 should be accorded the same priority as a Contact Report.

BIOLOGICAL/CHEMICAL NBC 1 REPORT
To
From
TitleNBC (BIO/CHEM)
As At/DTG
CODESUBJECTINFORMATION
Biological or Chemical
ALPHA (O)Strike serial number
BRAVO (M)Location of observer (GR)
DELTA (M)DTG attack
DTG attack end
FOXTROT (O)Location of attack
GOLF (M)Delivery means
INDIA (M)Release height
Type of agent
Persistency
Type of detector
TANGO (M)Terrain/vegetation
YANKEE (O)Wind
ZULU (O)Actual weather conditions
NOTES: (M) MANDATORY (O) OPERATIONALLY DETERMINED

ABBREVIATIONS

AAW Anti-Air Warfare
ACSSG Air Combat Service Support Group
ACSSU Air Combat Service Support Unit
ADR Airfield Damage Repair
AF Augmentation Forces
AFU Air Filtration Unit
AOCC Area of Operations Co-ordination Centre
APOD Air Port of Disembarkation
APOE Air Port of Embarkation
ATO Ammunition Technical Officer
AWC Air Warfare Centre
BC Battle Casualty
BDA Bomb Damage Assessment
BFA Blank Firing Attachment
BRACIS Biological, Radiological and Chemical Information System
BW Biological Warfare
C&R Control and Reporting
C2 Command and Control
C3I Command, Control,Communications and
Intelligence
CAM Chemical Agent Monitor
CAOC Combined Air Operations Centre
CASEVAC Casualty Evacuation
CBA Combat Body Armour
CCA Contamination Control Area
CCS Common Core Skills/Casualty Clearance Station
CIMIC Civil Military Co-operation
COLPRO Collective Protection
CP Combo Pen
C PT Confirmatory Practical Training/
Contingency Planning Team
CPX Command Post Exercise
CQB Close Quarter Battle
CS Combat Soldier
CSR Chemical Safety Rule
CT Continuation Training
CW Chemical Warfare
CWS Common Weapon Sight
DAMCON Damage Control
DCM Drinking Coupler Male
DFP Defensive Fire Position
DOB Deployment Operating Base
EMP Electromagnetic Pulse
EOD Explosive Ordnance Disposal
EOR Explosive Ordnance Reconnaissance
ESA Explosive Storage Area
EXCON Exercise Control
FAP First Aid Post
FCO Fire Control Order
FCP Forward Control Point
FE Force Element
FOB Forward Operational Base
FTX Formation Training Exercise
FU Formed Unit
GDCC Ground Defence Control Centre
GDT Ground Defence Training
GZ Ground Zero
HCP Hardened Collective Protection
HN Host Nation
HNS Host Nation Support
HR High Readiness
HVAA High Value Airborne Asset
IA Immediate Action
IC Incident Commander
ICP Incident Control Point
IED Improvised Explosive Device
IOC Initial Operating Capability
IPE Individual Protective Equipment
IR Immediate Readiness
IRF Immediate Readiness Forces
IW Individual Weapon(s)
JFAC Joint Force Air Component
JRDF Joint Rapid Deployment Force
JRRF Joint Rapid Reaction Force
JTF Joint Task Force
KIA Killed in Action
KP Key Point
LAG Live Armed Guard
LCAD Lightweight Chemical Agent Detector
LHA Liquid Hazard Area
MAXEVAL Maximum Evaluation
MCAD Man-portable Chemical Agent Detector
MDF Main Defence Force
MDP Ministry of Defence Police
METL Military Element Task List
MOB Main Operating Base
MSR Militarily Significant Radiation
NAPS Nerve Agent Pre-treatment Set
NBC Nuclear Biological Chemical
NEO Non-Combatant Evacuation Operation
NFU Non-Formed Unit
NSE National Support Element
NSP Normal Safety Precautions
NTM Notice to Move
OOR OutofRegion
OPEVAL Operational Evaluation
OPLIM Operational Limitation
OPS Operational Performance Standard
OPSEC Operational Security
OS Offensive Support
OSS Operations Support Squadron
PSF Personnel Sen/ices Flight
PSM Primary Speech Module
PSO Peace Support Operations
PWE Protected Working Environment
PXR Post Exercise Report
RES Radiation Exposure State
RESF Restoration of Essential Services and Facilities
ROE Rules of Engagement
ROTA Release Other Than Attack
RRF Rapid Reaction Forces
RRR Rapid Runway Repair
RSC Readiness Status Category
RTB Respirator Transit Bag
RVD Residual Vapour Detector
SAA Skill At Arms
SAC Small Arms Collimator
SAT Small Arms Trainer
SGF Station Guard Force
SIBCRA Sampling and Identification of Biological,
Chemical and Radiological Agents
SITREP Situation Report
SMC Specialist Medical Care
SMEAC Situation, Mission, Execution, Ask questions,
Check understanding
SMRE Secure Management Radio Equipment
SN Sending Nation
SST Secondary Speech Transmitter
STANAG Standardisation Agreement (NATO)
STANEVAL Standards Evaluation
STO Sumve-to-Operate
SUSAT Sight Unit Small Arms Trilux
BC Total Battle Casualty
TBM Tactical Ballistic Missile
TFA Toxic Free Area
TFE Toxic Free Environment
TIH Toxic Industrial Hazard
TMD Theatre Missile Defence
TMH Trigger Mechanism Housing
TO Training Objective
CP Unhardened Collective Protection
UFR Unsatisfactory Feature Report
UGS Unattended Ground Sensors
UXB Unexploded Bomb
UXO Unexploded Explosive Ordnance
VA Vital Area/Vulnerable Area
VCP Vehicle Check Point
VHA Vapour Hazard Area
VHR Very High Readiness
VP Voice ProcedureA/ulnerable Point
W&R Warning and Reporting
WHT Weapon Handling Test
WIA Wounded in Action
WMD Weapon(s) of Mass Destruction
WOC Wing Operations Centre

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