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P.D. GRIFFIN
ENCYCLOPEDIA OF MODERN BRITISH ARMY REGIMENTS

The right to dispense with the necessity of drinking the loyal toast was inherited from two regiments. The Durhams' dispensation was given by King George III, possibly as a considered response to the official ban on its unofficial motto Faithful. The Shropshires were not required to drink the toast, nor to stand for the national anthem, a legacy of the 85th Regiment whose officers won the gratitude of George IV when they intervened to save him from a mob at the Theatre Royal in Brighton during an unpopular period in his reign. Officers of the Dtike of Cornwall's made the toast just once a year, on the sovereign's birthday, a unique custom which began with the privations of the Siege of Lucknow in 1857, when the officers' wine ration in the hard- pressed 32nd dwindled to such an extent that a decision was taken to reserve what was left for the Queen's birthday toast. The loyal toast as practised by officers of the Gloucestershire Regiment seems to ignore everyone present except the mess president and vice-president, who propose and respond the toast between themselves. This custom began during the Peninsular War, after a battle that left just two officers of the 28th standing, with an obligation to toast the King's health in this way. The regiment's membership of the Wolfe Society originated at the Battle of Quebec, where Gen Wolfe fell, mortally wounded, at the head of the 28th Regiment.

Special toasts were given in at least two regiments. The officers' mess of the 1st KOYLI drank a toast to 'Dyas and his Stormers', after which members and guests would stand in silence. This re-creation of a Peninsular War toast in the 51st Regiment focused on Ensign Dyas, famed for his bravery in leading a forlorn hope of volunteers to scale the walls of the fortress Badajoz in the siege of 1812. A Bumper toast to the 1st Duke of Kent, originally the province of the 2nd Dorset Regiment and their forerunners, the 54th Regiment, began in 1802 when Prince Edward took over the governorship of Gibraltar. His harsh discipline proved so unpopular, however, that soldiers from the garrison marched on his residence with assassination in mind, only to be scattered by a volley from the more loyal 54th. The Duke gratefully presented a silver punch bowl to the officers of the 54th, who have returned the consideration ever since by drinking the toast and inviting successive Dukes of Kent to be Colonel-in-Chief of the Regiment.

DWR colours and large honorary colours being marched through the streets of Huddersfield in the 1970s

DWR colours and large honorary colours being marched through the streets of Huddersfield in the 1970s

Officers of the King's Shropshire Light Infantry were reminded of the origins of the bugle badge with a mess dinner call taken from the French Messe de St Hubert, the patron saint of hunters.

THE YORKSHIRE REGIMENT

The regiment was formed in 2006 with the union of three regular infantry battalions: the Green Howards (regimental headquarters (RHQ) at Richmond with TA companies in Cleveland and North Yorkshire); the Duke of Wellington's Regiment (RHQ at Halifax with TA units in Keighley, Bradford and Huddersfield); and the Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire, the former West and East Yorkshire Regiments (RHQ in York with TA detachments at Leeds, Hull and Beverley). The 4th Battalion is Yorkshire's TA element.

DRESS DISTINCTIONS

The blue peaked cap and khaki beret carry the new badge, which is made up of the White Rose, worn by the Yorkshire Brigade in the 1950s and the Yorkshire Volunteers from 1967, and the demi-lion from the Duke of Wellington's cap badge. The Duke's crest and tide were conferred on the 33rd (West Riding) Regiment after his death in 1852, in honour of the long association between man and regiment that began in 1793 when he purchased a lieutenant colonelcy in the 33rd. As a younger officer Arthur Wellesley served with the 76th Foot. The new badge is pinned to a square green patch on the beret, a custom of the Green Howards. Stable belts are green with a blue band and scarlet stripe in the centre.

Eighteenth-century re-enactment group in the vestments of a marching regiment of the line at the time of Gen Wolfe's campaigns

Eighteenth-century re-enactment group in the vestments of a marching regiment of the line at the time of Gen Wolfe's campaigns

The East Yorkshires' badge, a star with the white rose of York on black in the centre, was employed by the PWO as a collar badge. The black part of the badge echoes the black line in the regiment's maroon and buff side hats and stable belts, and in the officers' shoulder cords, an old distinction of the East Yorkshire Regiment (EYR) which commemorates the death of Gen Wolfe at Quebec. Buff was the old facing colour of the 14th Regiment, restored to the West Yorkshire Regiment (WYR) in 1900. PWO buttons, impressed with the West Yorks' Prince of Wales's plume and the Horse of Hanover, omitted their button honours - the royal tiger within a circle inscribed INDIA and WATERLOO. The Prince of Wales's crest and title were bestowed on the 14th Regiment in 1876 after an inspection by His Royal Highness at Lucknow.

The Duke of Wellington's Regiment (DWR) badge had been worn on a scarlet backing since the Second World War. Scarlet was the facing colour of the 33rd and 76th Regiments that was returned to the DWR in 1905 and later extended to its stable belts, lanyards, ranking and bugle cords. The DWR collar badge, an elephant with howdah circumscribed HINDOOSTAN, was granted to the 76th Regiment in 1807 for distinguished service on Lord Lake's campaign of 1803, during which the regiment was known as 'The Old Immortals' from its remarkable ability to climb back to fighting strength after each devastating battle of the Mahratta Wars.

The band of the Duke of Wellington's Regiment marching through the ranks prior to its amalgamation with other bands of the King's Division in 1994

The band of the Duke of Wellington's Regiment marching through the ranks prior to its amalgamation with other bands of the King's Division in 1994. (Soldier)

The Green Howards' badge brought together the coronet and A cypher of Princess Alexandra with the Dannebrog (Danish cross) of her homeland, above the regimental numeral XIX. The title Princess of Wales's Own was conferred on the 19th Regiment in 1875 after she had presented new colours at Sheffield. As a cap badge the design incorporated a scroll inscribed with the regiment's title, which was updated to the Green Howards in 1951. This curious title was invoked in 1920 from an old nickname which came about in 1744 when the regiment, then known as the Hon. Charles Howard's, found themselves on campaign with another called Howard's. The two regiments had to distinguish between themselves and did so by the facings colours on their red coats, which produced 'Howard's Buffs' and 'Green Howards'. A few years after this all regiments were identified by a number based on their seniority in the line and the problem was eliminated.

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